About me.

“One may have a blazing hearth in one’s soul and yet no one ever came to sit by it. Passers-by see only a wisp of smoke from the chimney and continue on their way.” — Vincent Van Gogh

Hullo, I’m Eve, and I write poetry and prose here at my blog “Redwater Ramblings”.
I love crows, nature, and compelling stories.

I mainly focus my writing style around contemporary, free-verse poetry. Nature is also a massive influence when writing my poetry, and I weave it in to my work with the best of my ability. I’ve been writing poetry here since 2011, with one ambition:

to improve.

I have just completed my BA degree in East Asian Studies, and have hopes of completing a Masters at some point in the not too distant future.

I also have one poem published in a poetry anthology named “The Clock Strikes Thirteen” via Forward Poetry.

At the age of twenty-two, I finally learned how to ride a bicycle in Kyoto, Japan – but only after successfully destroying several bike stands, bollards, and shop signs along the way!

Welcome, it’s great to have you along for the ride~

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120 thoughts on “About me.

  1. Hi Stacey!

    Thanks so much for visiting my blog and for subscribing! (I think I called you Eve in my reply, sorry!) Anyway, I look forward to reading your rambles, as well!

    Lauren 🙂

  2. What fun, and don’t give up on the cat, it’ll happen someday. Love the picture on top of the blog, very nice theme! I’ll be back for more here!

  3. An old Native American legend tells of a cat, a very special cat!
    Each and every Eve the feline casts her eyes over the red water of the forgotten lake. It has been for told by the Great one and Sissel knows, her forever home is somewhere beyond the red water!
    Someday you will cross that forgotten lake and unite with Sissel. Until that day the Great one will protect and comfort her!

    • Well, I certainly hope I can unite with Sissel soon! He’s far too cute within the depth of my imagination! Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment that made me smile, Jim. Come by any time! Eve~

  4. Hey Eve, told you I would drop by! I’ve only glanced at your poems but I’m really loving what I see! Can’t wait to read more. By the looks of it, we have similar styles and perhaps we could learn from each other 🙂

  5. Hello Stacey…thank you for visiting my site today and for leaving such nice comments on my posts. I am very happy you stopped-by, because now I know you’re here, too. I perused your entries earlier this morning and am quite taken with your writing. I shall be following and visiting your regularly. Take care, Scott.

  6. Hi Stacey,
    Enjoying your poetry, and love the photo of you under the umbrella. Thanks so much for following my blog and commenting on my poem, Tappity-tap.

  7. I spent too many weeks with my sister’s family in Kobe… and yet I did not learn the “not yet known to the west secret of the bike ride.”

    Neither my sister nor her husband are of Japanese de(s)cent, it was strictly a business/lifestyle posting, yet they lived, loved and conflagurated for 8 years. Still, no one taught me the secret of the bike ride, and yes, “we’ve traded” I visited often. So I must wonder aloud (although I’m not actually saying this out loud, it’s just a figure of the written word – Dammit, I just made that up, “figure of the written word,” okay it’s yours now, but please credit me)

    So where was I? Oh who cares, “Figure of the written word.” Somehow you spurred that out of me. Well done.

    • I had the great opportunity to go and see the memorial illuminations in Kobe in honour of the 1995 earthquake. It was simply stunning. The amount of people that covered the entirety of the the streets was easily over the thousands. It made for some wonderful pictures; especially when my friends and I were being herded by a man with some rather fetching glow-sticks! That being said, it was a beautiful memorial.

      My bicycle riding skills improved vastly during my time there! Not to mention many un-savoury crashes. (One right in front of many construction workers. So embarrassing!)

      Thank you for visiting me!
      Eve

  8. My brother in law is there now. A much better person than me, he actually drove trucks filled with food and clothes up north last spring. I’ve lived all over the world (most of my adult life in Europe, emphasis Budapest/Prague) and yet Japan will always have a “tug” on me.

    It’s never taken me longer to win people over, yet then to get them to leave me alone… ’twas impossible. Which is what family is, no? And all Americans could/should learn a tad from how the Japanese treat their parents/elders ie., Family. With respect. It’s a good thing. I could not now imagine my dad not living with me or my sister. Or my dead aunt’s body being stored in the attic.

    But you have to admit, it’s funny to watch old people ride bicycles. (which is in itself a funny word.)

    • I also unfortunately crashed into a fair few old people while riding their bicycles… the poor dears! They were so apologetic. I was greeted by one lovely old lady, that I’ll never forget, who held her umbrella over me in a rainstorm while I was waiting at a crossing on my bicycle. She was such a sweetheart! 🙂

  9. I just shared your blog with my sister and Bro-in-law, who know, I think, everyone in Japan, outside of the Chrysanthemum lineage.

    But I must admit, I did not get the full brunt of your last message, ie….. “the poor dears…” until I saw the smiley face emoticon at the end…. then it really hit home.

    (this is the” wreaking drench of sarcasm that comes with sarcasm,” but “raw ever ted…” EMOTICONS.? or is it just me? If it is tell me, and I’ll start using them….

    • Thank you very much! Alas, I don’t live there any more! I lived and studied at a University there for a year, but I’ve since been back in the UK for about as long. 🙂

  10. I know it’s your turn… but I wrote a story, OMG, I’m dating myself here, but in the mid 90’s for a European Paper about helping a blind women across the street in a decrepit Eastern European City as furry hatted passerby’s ignored her… and yet how inadequate it made me feel… not just about being sighted, but being an American, living overseas…. I think I own a copy, but it was before “online” copies… you’re last post made me think about that. Thanks.

  11. Late to bloom but perhaps like the Phoenix
    rising and in doing so, entering a new phase
    of enlightenment 🙂 The journey into fantasy
    is vast and the rewards greater than anything,
    even beyond the boundaries of outer space
    cannot hold back the dream…

    Enjoy thy quest and passionate interests…

    Androgoth

    • Hello Androgoth! Thank you very much for taking the time to visit my blog and leave me some messages! I think your blog is exceptionally creepy – in a good way! 🙂 Hope to see more of you in the future, please stop by any time!

      Eve

    • Thank you so much, David! I’m a big admirer of all your work. You’ve been recognised as a wonderful poet, both professionally and personally, and it means the world to me that you think of me in such a light. 🙂 I love your poetry too.

  12. Hi! Thanks for stopping by my blog! I don’t know how you do it but you certainly manage to create a wonderfully happy atmosphere around your words – so I couldn’t help subscribing.

    Good luck and great writing :)!

  13. Oh, aren’t you just Lovely!! What a thrill to be introduced to you and your creativity (absent sanity, I gather? ha ha)–thank you for visiting my blog, so that we could meet!! I too am a late-bloomer, Seriously! But you know what? All the best is still yet to be!! Thanks again–I’ll be back when I can take another break from work. Wishing you an excellent day–God bless you abundantly.

    • Thank you so much Caddo! It’s great to meet you! 😀 I’ve left you a message on your blog, too. I’m glad we could ‘meet’ like this. Hope to hear from you soon, take care!

      Eve

  14. Late bloomer? Mmm, what does that make me? 🙂
    Charming poetry Eve, along with others you have re awoken a dormant love within me.

    Peace

  15. 1st time caller. Yr fearless imaginative poetry is AOK by me, I’m glad I happened upon you & yr work tonight/ I like where yr own words go
    thanx, & look forward to looking in again

  16. Hello Eve,
    when does winter brighten into spring flowers in your neck of the UK? or do you have a mud season, like we do in maine?

    David in Maine USA

  17. Hi Stacey,
    Thanks for dropping by my humble abode. So glad that you like my poem. In my part of the UK spring sometimes deosn’t arrive until May, and summer is frequently cancelled. Reminds me of a couple of lines by Byron that I came across in my reading the other day:

    The English winter – ending in July,
    To recommence in August – now was done.

    Had he been Scottish he might have written:

    The Scottish winter – ending in August,
    to recommence in July – is never done.

    BTW – I don’t often read Byron. Perhaps I should.

    • My pleasure Tony! I really enjoyed your poem today. 🙂

      Certainly beautiful lines there, Byron captures the rise and fall of the seasons, and all the hopes and dashed expectations we hold for them so wonderfully!

      Thank you too, for visiting my site – please stop by any time!

  18. Good morning, Eve. It’s Wednesday, March 7. Today I blogged about “a root of bitterness.” I know that a poet comes up with his or her own inspiration, but I would love to see you tackle that theme in a poem. I would love to get your poetic take on it. Just a thought. It might not be something you would want to tackle, but I think you could do an amazing job with that theme. HF

  19. Hi Stacey, what a beautiful blog you have here! I’m so glad you visited my blog and introduced yourself so I could come explore here :). I’m going to dive into the poetry now, just wanted to say thanks for your visit.

    Take care,

    Emma

    • Oh, thank you Jamie! You’ve made my day!

      I love you photography – the one of the coffee beans really sticks in my mind for some reason… maybe too much caffeine on my part?
      Have a great day, and I hope to see you around soon. I look forward to your posts, too! 😀

  20. Your writing is beautiful. I write free verse poetry too. Been writing since my early teens but enjoy writing more now, than ever. You look so happy in your picture! Keep enjoying the journey that is life! 🙂

    • It’s lovely to meet you, thank you for finding my blog! Just having a look at your site now, love the bike photo. 🙂
      I started off writing in rhyme, but since I discovered free-verse I find it sits much better with me! It’s great to meet another free-verse lover~

      Hope to see you again soon!

      Eve x

  21. Beautiful. There is so much here, it will take a little while to take in. Your ability to marry the photographs with words is exceptional. Each adds to the other.

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